Relocating Wildlife

Relocating Wildlife

The Audubon Society of Portland Oregon states, in Wildlife Relocation: Not a Solution:
"One of the most disturbing trends in urban wildlife management is the increasing reliance upon relocation of wildlife to resolve human-wildlife conflicts. Relocation is commonly perceived as a quick, effective and humane solution. It is, in fact, none of the above. In the vast majority of cases, relocation is an ineffective, inhumane and ecologically destructive method for dealing with urban wildlife."

The Society's principal reasons are stated as follows:

  1. 'Relocation is usually ineffective. A new animal will usually quickly replace the one which was relocated. Effective long-term solutions can only be achieved by looking at what is attracting the animal and then removing the attractant (covering garbage cans, feeding pets indoors, sealing up potential denning areas in attics or under porches, etc.)
  2. 'Relocation is often inhumane. Many animals do not survive relocation. Each year, the Wildlife Care Center is brought hundreds of animals that have become injured or orphaned because of trapping. Animals that are relocated have to fight for new territories and are often injured or killed in the process. Relocation of a mother and young is almost always futile, since she must not only fight for territory, but also find food, shelter, and a safe place to raise her young. Juveniles are most likely abandoned or killed under these circumstances.
  3. 'Relocation is biologically unsound. Relocation of wildlife to new territories can disrupt the wildlife that is already living there. It also is a quick way to spread disease among wildlife populations. In many instances, sick animals are brought to our Care Center in cages side by side with animals that are about to be relocated.'

Similar and additional arguments are made by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in an article on relocating wildlife and the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management: Relocating Problem Wild Animals: Not as humane as you might think

And here's an article worth reading about relocating wildlife written by a nuisance wildlife trapper: And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Try a google search for relocating wildlife for far more information.

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